The Nature Center will be OPEN Wednesday, Dec. 27 - Saturday, Dec. 30 from 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM for holiday visitors!

ANIMAL RESCUE & REHABILITATION

What do I do with a wounded animal?

The Darien Nature Center receives many calls from concerned residents about found, injured and abandon animals.

Birds, rabbits, deer and squirrels are some of the more common animals that make their way to our door.

If you have an injured or orphaned animal, please do not drop it off at the Nature Center. The Darien Nature Center does not take injured animals, we do not have the required state license. Please contact one of the local rehab facilities/persons listed below or click on the link for valuable information.

http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2723&q=326228&deepNav_GID=1655

Squirrels – Occasionally young squirrels fall from their nest onto the ground. Before bringing these animals to a rehabilitator, try reuniting them with the adults by placing them in a basket and hanging it securely in the original nesting tree. Wear gloves to avoid direct contact with the young squirrels. If they are not retrieved within 24 hours contact a rehabilitator.

Rabbits – Rabbits tend to hide their young and visit them just a few times in a 24-hour period to prevent predators from finding the nest. If a nest of rabbits is disturbed, place the young rabbits back in the nest, cover them with leaf litter and place an X of string over the nest. Check it 12 -24 hours later to see if the string has been moved. If the female rabbit has returned to feed her young she will move the leaf litter and then push it back over the young so the string will no longer be in the shape of an X. If she does not return contact a rehabilitator.

Remember:

  • Young rabbits leave the nest and are able to eat on their own within 3-4 weeks even though they are extremely small.
  • If their eyes are open and they are eating solid foods they are not orphans! If this is the case they should not be moved or brought to a rehabilitator.

Cat Wounds – Cat wounds can become easily infected. Any animal with a noticeable puncture wound from a cat should be treated by a rehabilitator.

What else can I do? – Listed below are volunteers who are authorized to care for sick, injured or orphaned small mammals with the intent of returning them back to the wild. There are listings of other volunteers who handle other mammals such as raccoons, skunks, foxes, bats and deer. If you need assistance with one of these mammals, read the Dealing with Distressed Wildlife page.

Local Rehabilitators and what they take

Greenwich
Meredith Sampson, Wild Wings 203.637.9822
Mammals, Birds, Waterfowl, Reptiles, Raptors, Bats

Kristy Mango, 203.298.8612
Mammals

Norwalk
Marian Stovall 203-866-2214

Redding
Linda Fitzgerald, 203.938.4769
Birds

Stamford
Margaret Conrad, 203.524.2189
Mammals only

Gay Williams, 203-524-2189

Michelle Pavia, 203-984-0736

Catherine Fortin, 203.520.3385
Bats, Reptiles, Amphibians

Westport
Earthplace, 203.227.7253
Bats, Reptiles, Amphibians, Waterfowl, Birds

Weston
Wildlife in Crisis, 203.544.9913